Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2016 has been awarded to Jean-Pierre Sauvage, University of Strasbourg, France, Sir J. Fraser Stoddart Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA and Bernard L. Feringa University of Groningen, the Netherlands. 

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences decided to award the trio "for the design and synthesis of molecular machines". They have developed molecules with controllable movements, which can perform a task when energy is added and have made what can be called as the 'world's smallest machines'

The Royal Academy of Sciences members present 2016 Nobel Chemistry Prize during a news conference by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden October 5, 2016. The winners of the 2016 Nobel Chemistry Prize (L-R) Jean-Pierre Sauvage, J Fraser Stoddart and Bernard L Feringa are displayed on a screen | Source: Reuters 
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The development of computing demonstrates how the miniaturisation of technology can lead to a revolution. The 2016 Nobel Laureates in Chemistry have miniaturised machines and taken chemistry to a new dimension.

2016's Nobel Laureates in Chemistry have taken molecular systems out of equilibrium's stalemate and into energy-filled states in which their movements can be controlled.

Pictures of the winners of the 2016 Nobel Chemistry Prize: Jean-Pierre Sauvage, J Fraser Stoddart and Bernard L Feringa are displayed on a screen during a news conference by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden | Source: Reuters 
 

 

In terms of development, the molecular motor is at the same stage as the electric motor was in the 1830s, when scientists displayed various spinning cranks and wheels, unaware that they would lead to electric trains, washing machines, fans and food processors. 

Molecular machines will most likely be used in the development of things such as new materials, sensors and energy storage systems.