When there's life, there's death. But for some, it seems that life and legacy continue long after death in one way or the other. From Albert Einstein to James Doohan, the dead bodies of some of the famous personalities were subject to inappropriate treatment after their death while some chose to 'rest in peace' in a different way. 

Check out the list:

1. James Doohan

A portion of his ashes was put in a capsule and launched into earth's orbit. 

Best known for his role as Montgomery "Scotty" Scott in the television and film series Star Trek, James Doohan was an actor and voice-over artist. He died in 2005. After two failed attempts, a portion of his ashes was finally sent into space aboard the Falcon 9 rocket in 2012.

Source: Blastr

2. Tupac Shakur

Following his death in 1996, his friends from the rap group Outlaw Immortalz mixed his ashes with marijuana and smoked them.

Commonly known by the names of 2Pac and Makaveli, Tupac Shakur was an American rapper and actor. He was shot when was driving away from the Mike Tyson fight in Las Vegas in 1996. He died six days later, aged 25. His pals from the rap group Outlaw Immortalz mixed some of his ashes with marijuana and smoked them - as he’d once requested they do in the lyrics to his song Black Jesus. When asked about it Rapper EDI Mean said: ''If you listen to ‘Black Jesus', he said, 'smoke my ashes'.That was a request that he had. Now, how serious he was about it? We took it serious''.

Source: Collider

3. Ted Williams

Ted's head was cut off and was cryogenically frozen in liquid nitrogen storage tank while his body was preserved in a separate tank.

Commonly known as 'The Kid', Ted Williams was a baseball legend who died at the age of 83 in 2002. His head was cryogenically frozen in liquid nitrogen while his body was preserved in a separate tank, against his will. It was done so that he could be brought back to life in the future.

Source: WCVB

4. Ludwig van Beethoven

Beethoven’s body was smashed into pieces during autopsy.

One of the most famous composers of all time, Ludwig van Beethoven died in 1827 at the age of 56. However, during autopsy, his skull was shattered, his jaw was knocked out of alignment, and his ear bones went missing. Interestingly, in 1990, a man found a box in an attic labeled 'Beethoven'. And it was revealed that the pieces of bone and hair were those of the great composer.

Source: Waldina

5. Edward Headwrick

Headwrick instructed his children to mix his ashes with plastic to be moulded into Frisbees.

Edward 'Steady Ed' Headrick was the man responsible for the popularity of the modern-day Frisbee. He refined the design and created the World Frisbee Championships. He had instructed his children to mix his ashes with plastic to be moulded into Frisbees. He died aged 78 in 2002. Some of those frisbees were given to family and friends and others were auctioned off to raise money for his memorial foundation.

Source: Disc Golf

6. Fred Baur

Fred Baur, the inventor of Pringles can, was buried in one.

Fredric Baur, the man who invented the tubular shaped Pringles died aged 89 in 2008 after suffering from Alzheimer’s. His son fulfilled Baur's last wish by sealing some of his ashes in a Pringles can. 'My siblings and I briefly debated what flavour to use,' said son Larry, 57, at the time, 'But I said, Look, we need to use the original', he added.

Source: Suvojyoti Roy

7. Albert Einstein

Thomas Harvey stole Einstein's brain to learn what made him a genius.

When Einstein died at the Princeton hospital in 1955, pathologist Thomas Harvey found himself alone in the morgue with the scientist's body. Harvey stole his brain to learn what made Einstein a genius.

Source: Planet Science

8. Galileo Galilei

After his death, most of his body parts went missing including his bones which were taken by his followers as mementos.

World famous astronomer, and physicist Galileo Galilei died in 1642, aged 77. After his death, most of his body parts eventually went missing including his bones which were taken by his followers as mementos. The Galileo Museum in Florence, Italy, houses several of Galileo's fingers and one tooth.

Source: IQ Test Me

9. André Tchaikowsky

In his will, Tchaikowsky donated his skull to the Royal Shakespeare Company and asked to use it as a prop on stage.

André Tchaikowsky was a Polish composer and pianist who died of colon cancer at the age of 46.  Tchaikowsky left his body to medical research, and donated his skull to the Royal Shakespeare Company and asked to use it as a prop on stage. For many years, no actor or director felt comfortable using a real skull in performances. It was the year 2008 when the skull was finally held by David Tennant in a series of performances of Hamlet.

Source: Discover Magazine

10. Hunter S Thompson

When Thompson died, his ashes were fired from a cannon which was placed atop a 150 ft tower, accompanied by red, white, blue and green fireworks and his favourite songs.

Hunter S Thompson was a writer and journalist who pioneered Gonzo journalism and wrote the iconic book Fear and Loathing. He committed suicide aged 67 in 2005. He was a close friend of Johnny Depp. Depp was determined to make sure Hunter got a Hollywood-worthy send off. So, Thompson’s ashes were fired from the cannon (which was placed atop a 150 ft tower) with red, blue and green fireworks to the soundtrack of Hunter's favourite songs.

Source: Morrison Hotel

11. Bruce Reynolds

His son, Nick, saved some of his ashes and scattered them near the pyramids at the Valley Of The Kings in Egypt.

1963 Great Train Robbery in Britain. It was Britain's largest robbery at the time which was equivalent to £41 million (2013). After spending five years on the run, he was sentenced to 25 years in 1969. He died in 2013. Most of his ashes were buried in the cemetery but his son, Nick, saved some portion and scattered them near the pyramids. His son even posted a message on Facebook: 'Last handful! R.I.P in the worlds greatest Necropolis xx'.

Source: Express

12. Mark Gruenwald

His final wish was that he wanted some of his ashes mixed with ink and made into a comic book.

Marvel comic book editor Mark Gruenwald died unexpectedly of a heart attack aged just 42 in 1996. One of his final wishes was, he wanted some of his ashes mixed with ink and made into a comic book. His wish was granted the following year when Marvel used his ashes to illustrate 'Squadron Supreme' which was a limited edition comic which Gruenwald had written in 1985.

Source: Blog

13. Napoleon Bonaparte

In his will, Napoleon Bonaprte asked for his head to be shaved and divided amongst his friends

Bonaparte was a French military and political leader who died in 1821 at the age of 51. It's recently been found that this hair contained large amounts of arsenic and his symptoms before his death were akin to arsenic poisoning. Along with the provision for people of wounded troops and their families in his will, Napoleon Bonaparte asked for his head to be shaved and divided amongst his friends.

Source: The Telegraph