Sure, box office numbers can never evaluate the prowess of a film. Nonetheless, with a slew of movies bombing at the ticket booths, we are triggered to demystify the key reasons for them turning out to be a dud.   

So, the next time a filmmaker wonders why selling an old whiskey in an older bottle didn't work out, you have nine facts to hurl in the faces. 

1. Bollywood thinks it's because we don't respect their hard work but it is primarily because of their lousy scripting.

Sanjay Dutt recently voiced his dismay with the audience not willing to watch Shamshera in the cinema halls. Instead of taking responsibility of the half-baked film, he accused the audience of not respecting their hard work. Why didn't you try putting in a little more 'hard work' and save us from another Thugs of Hindostan?

Sanjay Dutt in Shamshera
Source: SW

2. They finish films in mere 40 days and it reflects in the quality of their product. 

For some reason, Samat Prithviraj's makers took tremendous pride in boasting that it only took 100 days to complete a historical drama with Akshay Kumar. Later, fans found out that the movie was riddled with loopholes and the titular character reminded them of Akshay's Rajkumar Bala from Housefull 4. 

 Samat Prithviraj
Source: HT

3. They don't experiment with stories and genres. We can easily predict their plot twists.

Nothing is more disappointing than paying for a film that doesn't catch you off guard. Nope, not even in the climax. The stories feel recycled and they often flinch away from bringing anything original to the table. Hence, they are unable to win the audience over.

Zero
Source: Zee News

4. They think they're giving a fresh perspective to classic movies but are actually serving us with crappy remakes. 

After much contemplation, I think the remake business is simply fuelling lethargy. They invest zero effort in conceptualising titular songs, the central theme, or even a fresh backdrop. Bhool Bhulaiyya 2 resurrected the story of Monjolika, in 2022, and ultimately proved that oh-ghosts-are-real while the prequel in 2008 ventured into the narrative of mental health. Have we sailed back in time?

Bhool Bhulaiyya 2
Source: The Indian Express

5. They believe that love songs complement the storyline, but they actually stretch the film and the lyrics mostly make no sense. 

Once and for all, lengthy songs amidst awful movies are the last thing we wish to see when all we want is to run away from the theatre ASAP. I can't even begin expressing the trauma that Selfish in Race 3 had on me! I was deceased.  Maybe it was the price I paid for agreeing to watch that clusterf*ck of a film.  

Selfish in Race 3
Source: Koimoi

6. They think sequels make the audience connect more but in reality they are just another reason to hate the original. 

Case in point: Heropanti 2. All the chhoti bacchis regretted watching the film. Yep, me too.

Heropanti 2
Source: The Statesman

7. While they keep peddling the same old themes, OTT content triumphs with unconventional storylines. 

While mainstream Bollywood continues to demonstrate its mediocrity, OTT platforms are exploding with content that feels like a breath of fresh air. Kangana Ranaut's Dhaakad was released simultaneously with Jeetendra Kumar's Panchayat 2, the latter won with a sweeping margin

Dhakad ad Panchayat 2
Source: SW

8. They rope in superstars to draw loyal fans, regardless, a weak story never survives.

No matter how many flowers bloom next to the gutter, an obscene stench will always hit you. Yes, Thugs of Hindostan, we are looking at you. 

Thugs of Hindostan
Source: Bollywood Hungama

9. Their highly ambitious films spend time dreaming rather than delivering. 

Bollywood often attempts to break into the never-before-seen category and falls flat on its face. A stark reminder of it is Ra One, starring SRK. The villain was a clown so, the captivating songs or even SRK himself couldn't rescue the drowning film.

Ra One
Source: India Today

Some films flop at the box office while the others, despite earning big bucks, flop in winning over the audience. 

Do better, Bollywood.