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Oct 02, 2017 at 13:15

If You Want To Escape To A Place Where Nobody Can Reach You, Head To This Hidden Himachali Village

by Era Tangar

Notes from the Diary

I sit sometimes to think 'what is it that we are running after?'
What is it? Is it some sort of a zone of eternal happiness?
What is it? A state of mind that stays at peace all the time?
Tbh, I don't understand.
The fuck is everyone running after? Leaving me behind, for I can’t run no more.

This is what I had written just a month before I visited Pulga, a dreamy quaint little village (known for its fairy forest) nestling in the Parvati valley in Himachal Pradesh, along with two others: Kalga and Tulga. 

Source:  Instagram // blindlyfloating

 

Where is it?

Pulga is situated in Himachal Pradesh, at the height of 9498 feet above sea level. (Yes, I googled this while I was in Pulga and yes, there is connectivity but it took the google search about 5 minutes to process, so don't keep your hopes too high up when it comes to Wi-Fi.)

How to get there:

We boarded a Volvo from Delhi to Bhuntar on 7th September, at around 8:30 pm. Our driver was the coolest guy who drove with no inhibitions. The bus ride cost us Rs 900 each.

So here's what we did afterward:

- Took a cab to Katagla. (Katagla is the first place we visited. It is a small settlement near Challal and Kasol. That place has insane flowers, spiders, cats and hey, who doesn't like the sound of the river?)

Source: Instagram // blindlyfloating

 

- Spent a night in Katalga at a place where people were music lovers to such an extent that they would play psychedelic music at 7 in the morning. Who does that?

- Ate a lot of food. Sat by the river. Felt the cold water of the river. Almost died because the water was frosty as fuck. Took lots of pictures of flowers, cats and made a time-lapse video of a joint being rolled with the river as the hazy backdrop.

- Left Katagla at 1 pm on 9th September for Pulga. 

Source: Instagram // blindlyfloating

 

Pulga, from Kasol, is a 2-2.5 hour drive. It costs around Rs 100-200/person. This drive was an absolute bliss for us. The clouds were being kind and shielding us again the harsh rays of the sun but keeping the gloom of a sun-less sky away, leaving behind chilly winds and immense peace.

At around 4 pm, we found ourselves at the bottom of a hill. Here, the construction of the Parvati Hydel Project, a hydroelectric dam, dominates the landscape. We had to trek for about 30 minutes to get to Pulga from there.

It was still sunny when we reached Pulga. The clouds were all colors and magical.

Source: Instagram // blindlyfloating

 

Notes from the Diary

Flowers in my hair.
Hair got the smell of the forest and rain.
Skin feels cool. Skin presents a dire need to fly.

When everything around you is like a reward, little discomforts aren't discomforts. They are just the way things are. That is what blending with nature means. And Pulga sits there, with open arms, like nature itself, ready to soak you in, complete. 

Source: Instagram // blindlyfloating

 

Notes from the Diary.

There is just so much that I can say about the colours in the sky...

What to expect:

At around 7, all of us sat together, around a table full of food, surrounded by apple trees, mild drizzle, cold winds as the smoke kept leaving our lungs, into the air. As I always say, it was surreal.

When you get what you wish for.

A post shared by Era🍂 (@blindlyfloating) on

We stayed at a place called Apple Garden. The apple orchard at the place was so unreal, it looked like a set freshly prepped for Alice in Wonderland.

Source: Instagram // blindlyfloating

 

There was just one guy at the Apple Garden, taking care of 19 guests on the night we reached Pulga. This superhuman of a person cooked food for everyone, all by himself, while also getting baked as he delivered. And the food was amazing. I was stunned, impressed, speechless at the energy in that boy. 

Notes from the Diary.

Here's a thing about magic. Those who believe it's real, it's real. .
These energies are everywhere around us but amidst nature, one can feel them and experience them clearly. I guess because mind space is a little less cluttered.
You ask for anything, it just happens. Rain? You got rain. Rainbows? Booyah! You got rainbows. Literally anything you wish for, comes true. Nature is nice like that. .
Source: Instagram // blindlyfloating

 

All my technology was almost dead by the time I reached Pulga. Being observant is the key here. We also saw a rainbow. The craziest, most majestic rainbow which nestled like a ball in a valley far away.

Source: Instagram // blindlyfloating

 

Notes from the Diary.

New experiences are not so much about your external environment but more about your internal one. They give you jolts and a new ripple sprouts. The ripples form ideas and hence, thoughts. Thoughts turn into actions that, in turn, affect our external environment.
Point being, our actions are heavily dependent on our thoughts and thoughts evolve with experiences. New experiences are an opportunity to widen your perspective. 

 

You won't spot a lot of people in Pulga which makes it a great place to escape from people and just get soaked in nature and stay lost in your own world. 

From making friends with absolute strangers to walking endlessly through the narrow lanes of the hamlet, this place offered me solitude even amongst people.

This was my wooden cabin (these are just windows but I didn't take many pictures in Pulga) where I could literally stay for the next month and just do my thing. But I couldn't. If you can, you must. It is just the most self-immersive experience you'd ever have. 

 

Everything smelt like peace and freedom in Pulga. Time was not a dimension. You could be anyone.

If you want a break from everything, you must visit this village and find out what it has got in store for you. Spot the fairies yourself. I came back a different person, much calmer.

It isn’t polluted, but if after reading this and you plan to make your way to Pulga, it is my personal request that you make a genuine effort to keep the space clean because, in the end, we are individually responsible to conserve the nature we admire so much. 

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