There are times when we feel defeated in the face of unbeatable circumstances. We give up on our dreams, believing that there could possibly be no way out.

But this Humans of Bombay post about a man - who was amputated at an age of 16, but later went on to win the World Cup Badminton for disabled people - proves that if you don't abandon hope, hope will not abandon you.

When he fell between the train and platform, he thought his dream had died.

"I was 16 when I fell between the train & platform. They had to amputate my legs & my dream died."
Source - Humans of bombay

He felt beaten by his predicament. And battled with suicidal thoughts. Society's insensitive outlook added to his misery.

"The time after was the darkest. Relatives said ‘Death would’ve been better.’ I even thought of suicide. But I was an only child. Who’d take care of my parents? For how long would they be around? I’d always be a burden."

But life wasn't done with him. So he made sure to not give up on life and clung to his willpower like anything. He started participating in wheelchair sports, and his dream lived on.

"One day, someone told me about wheelchair racing. I was excited–a part of my dream lived on. I started practicing daily until the day I could participate professionally. "
Representative image | Source - News 18

Wheelchair racing is where he met his best friend, Manoj, who told him how he had polio and had faced rejection too. He says that he didn't win the competition that day, but won a best friend. Since then they started training together. Manoj came like a ray of hope in his life and turned his cloudy days bright with warmth.

"I was scared of traveling but Manoj was my rock. For every competition, we met at CST & took a train together. His wife sent an extra dabba for me! This was our life–our sport, our trains & our dabbas."
Representative image | Source - The Bridge

Their training paid off. In 2002 they won the World Cup Badminton for disabled people. Two years later they participated in the Mumbai Marathon and finished it. Now, it's been 15 years and they haven't missed a single race.

Representative image | Source - Firstpost

Looking back he credits a match in 2005 where they won against unbeatable champions, with no professional training or good wheelchairs - as the source of their sheer willpower.

He claims with all the sass that,

"People told us sports was a distant dream when we couldn’t even walk. But little did they know we weren’t meant to stand on our feet, we were meant to fly.”
Representative image | Source - Youtube

Their story stands as a precedent of willpower that defies great odds, of friendship that helps you sail through gravest of circumstances, and of sportsmanship that knows no limits.

Read the complete post here.

“My dream was to be a cricketer. I spent hours at Shivaji Park & took part in the Harris Shield Tournament. I was 16 when I fell between the train & platform. They had to amputate my legs & my dream died. The time after was the darkest. Relatives said ‘Death would’ve been better.’ I even thought of suicide. But I was an only child. Who’d take care of my parents? For how long would they be around? I’d always be a burden. My parents insisted I start physical therapy. That hospital was a marvel to me. Kids who had suffered were laughing–if they could be happy, why couldn’t I? I moved on & opened a store. I even got past the pity from my old friends. One day, someone told me about wheelchair racing. I was excited–a part of my dream lived on. I started practicing daily until the day I could participate professionally. There, I met my best friend, Manoj. He told me about how he had polio & had faced rejection too, but he’d found competitive swimming. I didn’t win that competition but I’d met someone who got me. Since then, we trained together. I was scared of traveling but Manoj was my rock. For every competition, we met at CST & took a train together. His wife sent an extra dabba for me! This was our life–our sport, our trains & our dabbas. Soon we decided to compete in badminton doubles. Our training paid off because in 2002, we won the World Cup Badminton for disabled people! Nobody expected it–we didn’t even have proper sports wheelchairs. In 2004, we ran the Mumbai Marathon & finished it together. What an experience! It got us recognised all over & we haven’t missed even one in 15 years! When people ask us how we did it, we think back to our match in 2005. We played against unbeatable champions, we didn’t have good wheelchairs, no professional training–we didn’t have a chance. But we won by 1 point! It was sheer will power. People told us sports was a distant dream when we couldn’t even walk. But little did they know we weren’t meant to stand on our feet, we were meant to fly.” ---- Humans of Bombay with Nature Valley Snack Bars brings stories of ‘Runners of Bombay’ who fuel their lives with passion & purpose, against insurmountable odds. #RechargeWithNature

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