From Virginia Woolf and Alice Walker, to Malala Yousafzai, a lot has been said and written about feminism. Countless theories and philosophical aspects of feminism have been scrutanized, but what a normal girl feels on day-to-day basis is often left unsaid and unfelt.

We came across an article on Vagabomb , that introduces Molly Williams , a 20-year-old college student, who creates illustrations that highlight these things. Here are some of her illustrations on quotes by famous people:

Today's #wcw is the phenomenal activist and author Angela Davis. I was first acquainted with her work when I read her book Are Prisons Obsolete, which makes (in my opinion) a very strong case for prison abolition based on prison's inherent status as an oppressive institution designed to incapacitate "undesirable" members of society. Apart from being a strong voice during the Civil Rights Movement and a continued advocate against manifestations of racism, Davis is also a radical feminist who has spoken up frequently about the exclusion of women from social movements and the struggle for equality. Her book Women, Race and Class presents a history of the women's rights movement that acknowledges the differences between the experiences of black and white women and, more broadly, considers class, race and gender to be inextricably linked.

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Today's #wcw is Frida Kahlo. Whether or not she was labeled or would have labeled herself a feminist during her lifetime, her art, words and actions were both fascinating and exemplary. A iconic Mexican painter and political activist best known for her self-portraits, Kahlo had a strong and vibrant sense of personal style, hair that she was unashamed of (as it should be), a colorful life that informed her art and a zeal for revolution.

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This week's #wcw is Malala Yousafzai. Most people know her as the girl who was shot by the Taliban, but her heroism extends beyond that horrific experience. Before the attack, when she was 11, she was already writing blog posts for BBC describing her life was like in Pakistan under Taliban rule and her views about women's education. Since the attack, she has been even more outspoken in the fight for women's education and has inspired people all over the world. In 2014, she became the youngest-ever Nobel Prize laureate(!!). Malala's story reminds us that every voice matters, and that being young should not keep you from standing up for what you believe in. Every voice can make a difference.

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This week's #wcw is Audre Lorde. Lorde (1934-1992) was a radical feminist, womanist, civil rights activist and writer of poetry, essays and novels. Her work often criticized second-wave feminism for not being inclusive of women of color and their struggles; she believed that rather than whitewashing differences, feminism should acknowledge differences and the ways in which they affect human behavior. Although she was a womanist, she was critical of that movement as well, as it often excluded lesbian voices such as hers. The above quote is from a 1991 keynote presentation she gave entitled "The Uses of Anger: Women Responding to Racism."

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Her illustrations are not only about famous quotes, but also about fictional characters. They put up important points about basic things women still struggle around, like sexuality, identity, choices, freedom, stereotyping on the basis of gender.

#feminism #feminist #feministart #art #drawing #body #religion #prochoice

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#feminism #feminist #feministart #art #drawing #gendering #gender #unnecessary #stop

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#feminism #feminist #feministart #art #drawing #body #period #noneofyourbusiness #anger #assholes

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If you guys have themes/ideas you would like to see, drop me a comment! I want to make these drawings inclusive of the widest possible range of women and their experiences.

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#feminism #feminist #feministart #art #drawing #boyswillbeboys #excusesexcuses

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#feminism #feminist #feministart #drawing #art #catcalling #notokay #nothanks #bye

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As a mixed-race girl with curly hair, this is my entire life. #feminism #feminist #feministart #art #drawing #hair #handsoff

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You are not alone in the fight.