In a world where homophobia is still on pertinent, the coming out story of this 25-year-old is heartwarming. Gaurang, who has lived with his grandparents since he was 7-years-old shares the story of how he came out to them in this Humans Of Bombay post. 

Though his grandparents were shocked at first, there were quick to hug him and say ‘all we want is for you to do good in life.’

Source: Humans Of Bombay
Last year, after coming out to a friend, I thought I should tell them too. For the first 10 minutes, there was complete silence. Then nana put his hand on his chest and broke down. Nani cried too. 
Source: Humans Of Bombay

This incident encouraged him to come out to the world on Facebook and even invite his friends from the trans community home. His grandparents even volunteered to be a part of the pride parade, but sadly due to their health, they couldn't make it, he shares. 

They’ve come such a long way— from being upset initially to wanting to walk pride parades with me!
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“I’ve been raised by nana nani since I was 7, and ever since, they’ve been like parents to me.So last year, after coming out to a friend, I thought I should tell them too. For the first 10 minutes, there was complete silence. Then nana put his hand on his chest and broke down. Nani cried too. A few minutes later, they said, ‘all we want is for you to do good in life.’ I’d never felt so much relief–I hugged them tight, and a few days later, I put up a Facebook post coming out to the world. With them by my side, I felt like I had nothing to be afraid of. Within a few weeks, nana even asked me to call my friends from the transgender community over! We had a chai session on the balcony and chatted about pretty much everything. They then decided they wanted to walk my first ever pride parade with me, but they couldn’t because of their health. So instead, we decided to do a fun shoot with matching pride t-shirts! Nana nani read all my posts now. I sometimes send them LGBTQ articles and they have so many questions. Recently, nana asked, ‘How many people are in your gang?’ I burst out laughing, held his hand and said, ‘Nana, it’s not a gang, it’s a community.’ They’ve come such a long way— from being upset initially to wanting to walk pride parades with me! And now, I’m comfortable wearing makeup in front of them too. The best part is that they don’t treat me any differently than before, and that’s what gives me the confidence to just be me, even in front of the rest of the world.”

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He shared how he now feels comfortable wearing make-up around them and even has them read his articles on the community. His grandparents give hope to those who fear being ostracised from society due to their sexual orientation or gender choices. These adorable Nana Nani are an inspiration!