We have seen the BBC documentary and the most important thing that you need to know about it is -- you need to see it. The content does not incite. It serves as a mirror as well as a looking glass. To see in great detail what happened on the night of December 16, 2012. To understand what it means for you as an individual and for the country as a collective.

We implore you to see it and decide for yourself how you feel about it. The government cannot take this decision for you.

- SCROLL DOWN FOR THE DOCUMENTARY -

Jyoti Singh, widely referred to as Nirbhaya, was brutally raped and murdered in New Delhi. Her parents narrate their agonising last moments with their daughter. They refer to her with her real name and say they have no problem in revealing her name.

Mukesh Singh's statements made news in the last three days. He is remorseless and narrates the details of the night like an event witnessed. He insists that he drove the bus and did not participate in other 'bad activities' that night. They, the six of them, got drunk and decided to party and soon after picked up Jyoti and her friend in their bus. He remains devoid of any emotion - neither arrogant, nor repentant.

"I can't say why it happened" Mukesh says referring to the rape and murder

"I knew nothing about her", he says and adds he got to know that she was studying to be a doctor from news reports.

"A girl is just like a flower. It gives a good looking, very softness.. performance, pleasant [sic]. On the other hand a man is just like a thorn. Strong, tough enough. That flower always needs protection. If you put that flower in a gutter it is spoilt. If you put it in the temple, it is worshipped," M.L. Sharma, the defence lawyer for the rapists, says in the documentary.

He also says at one point in the documentary, "India has the best culture. No place for a woman in our culture."

"It's a very safe city," Pramod Kushwa, the Additional Deputy Commissioner, Delhi Police says about Delhi.

Delhi is a very safe city. It is also known as the rape capital. Jyoti Singh died of extreme injuries. The documentary is disturbing. It is meant to be. Acknowledging the present scenario, true state of India, and then to be pushed into making it safe not only for women, but for everyone is imperative. It will have to start with acceptance at the governance level.

If the Information and Broadcast Ministry takes it down from the internet owing to the blanket ban on any publication or broadcast that was announced on March 4, 2014, it will be a big loss for the things our Constitution stands for - democracy, freedom of speech and expression. Things that are taught in schoolbooks and are meant to be forgotten in real life. This documentary is not hate speech content and is fit for viewing by every adult.

Watch the video here:

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via ScoopWhoop News

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