The Odd-Even rule has undoubtedly been the most debated topic of the month. The rule was implemented in Delhi from 1st January to 15th January, 2016, in an effort to reduce pollution levels and traffic congestion in the national capital. While people expressed different opinions about the so-called trial run, we think it did Delhi some much-needed good. 

The trial run ended today and we can already feel us being back to square one with jam-packed roads all around the city. Here's why we absolutely loved the Odd-Even formula and should welcome it back with open arms:

Pollution levels were reducing. The margin was little but significant enough to reduce health hazards, according to TERI

Source: Youth ki awaaz

We could actually see Delhi unite. People were ready to carpool, use public transport or do whatever it takes to make our city a better place to live.

Source: NDTV

For regular commuters like me, the roads were relatively empty. No rush during the rush hour is a rarity in the capital.

Source: your amazing places

Less money spent on fuel.

Less traffic means a better average speed and by extension, a better fuel economy.

Source: India today

Not spending hours on the road left us with plenty of time to make other plans. The fixed routine of home-office-home could be altered.

Source: my purple martini

For those who drove everyday, it was a good break from being behind the wheels everyday. 

Source: Royal Bulletin

Emergency vehicles like ambulances and fire trucks did not have to battle traffic to reach their required destinations. 

Source: Caravan

They say, no country (or city, in this case) is perfect. Yes, Delhi has its flaws. But this was a really positive step. For it to be a long-term success, we need better public transport facilities and stricter rules. 

But for someone who was very apprehensive when the idea was first suggested, I can tell you after two weeks that I quite like it. It makes a lot of sense and is a viable solution to a lot of problems in the city. 

Source: huffingtonpost

While it lasted, the Odd-Even rule seemed to be doing wonders. Delhi is majorly ridiculed by so many people around India. This one time, though, it came together to prove why it is the capital. Well played, Delhi!

It may not have lasted very long, but we proved that we are ready to fight for a better city. Maybe people will voluntarily follow the rule? 

The coming weeks will tell.