Quietly, in its own way, nature performs miracles, some which man stumbles across occasionally and some which we might never find and get the chance to look at and catch our breath in awe.

Someone accidentally stumbled upon the breath-taking “Hidden Beach” or “Playa de Amor” (Beach of Love) in the scenic Marieta islands and it looks like a surreal, secluded idyll straight out of a dream.

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The beach, 20 nautical miles from Puerto Vallarta in Mexico was found under a huge cavern like shell, untouched and pristine with fine, white sand and waters so blue, you feel like running and diving in them.

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The beach was discovered only recently and suddenly it's on everybody's travel bucket list.

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The history behind the place is even more fascinating. The Marieta islands with its rich, lush flora and abundant variety of fauna was uninhabited. The Mexican government started using the islands as a bomb testing range in the 1900s ahead of the First World War. So while they were blowing shit up, these explosions left gaping holes in the island, altering rock formations and creating caves.

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It wasn't until the 1960s, following mass outrage and a movement led by scientist Jacques Cousteau to stop these harmful tests that the government ceased its destructive rampage. The tests stopped and the government even declared the place a national park. (Talk about hypocrisy) Activities such as fishing and hunting were strictly banned and the islands were finally left alone.

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The island started healing itself, bit by bit, water flowing from caverns, tides brought in sand and several years later the shore was formed.

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The beach is deviously difficult to reach. The only way in is via a helicopter drop and then through a small underwater opening measuring fifty feet, with 6 feet between water and rock through which you either have to swim or scuba dive which is possible only when it's low tide.

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The Marieta islands are a treasure trove of diverse marine life like humpback whales and manta rays and lush greenery. Formed by a volcanic explosion thousands of years ago, the islands also known as the “Galapagos of Mexico” are a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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The island is now protected by the Mexican government and cannot be entered without a permit.

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It's sunny all days of the year because of its tropical climate. Get yourself there during winter, when the water is sparkling blue and the weather is warm and you can bask in the solitude.

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Just you and nature, a much needed getaway.