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Human beings have been exploiting and torturing animals for their entertainment ever since mankind came into existence. We rid them of basic humanity and exhaust them to the point that their body gives up.

This is the sad story of a baby elephant named Dumbo who died after his hind legs snapped at the cruel hands of a zoo in Phuket, Thailand. According to Phuket News, Dumbo was subjected to performing for tourists thrice a day.

The three-year-old male elephant reportedly appeared very weak and was suffering from an infection before his body gave up. Three days after being kept in the zoo by vets who didn't realise his hind legs were broken, Dumbo was taken to the veterinary facility where he passed away.

The report also adds that campaigners had been advocating for Dumbo, whose real name is Jumbo, to be freed from the zoo and the cruelty he was going through at the hands of his keepers.

A petition to free Dumbo was also signed by more than 220,000 people which was initiated by Moving Animals. They posted on their Facebook page about how tragic the 3-year-old elephant's death was.

The post said,

We want to thank everyone for their overwhelming support for "Dumbo". We hope that "Dumbo" is now finding the peace that he was so cruelly denied in his lifetime, and that his tragic story will urge Thai authorities to finally put an end to these outdated animal performances.

A report by Daily Mail claimed that medics at the Thai zoo said that Dumbo was being kept in an isolation pen so that he could be away from the other animals.

Apparently, he got his front legs stuck in mud and while trying to free himself, he ended up breaking his hind legs. They were already very weak due to being forced to perform thrice a day.

The manager of Phuket zoo, Pichai Sakunsorn said that the elephant was neither neglected or tortured, and was a valuable asset to the zoo.

Source: LADbible

Reportedly, Phuket's Department of Livestock Development said that the zoo can acquire another elephant if it wishes to. However, it is not confirmed yet whether the zoo plans on doing so.