There's a lot that goes into making a film. And certain stories from Bollywood sets deserve a movie of their own. Like these: 

1. When shooting for Andhadhun, Ayushmann Khurrana walked around Pune, without being recognized. 

From using a special pair of lenses that affected his vision by 80% to actually learning how to play the piano and not using a body double, Ayushmann Khurrana really went the mile while preparing for his role in Andhadhun. In fact, he immersed himself into the character so perfectly, that no one recognized him on the streets in Pune, when he walked around with a walking stick and black glasses. 

Ayushmann in Andhadhun
Source: Steem peak

2. The chase scene between Rajkummar Rao and Zeeshan in Gangs of Wasseypur was thought of and scripted on the sets. 

The now-famous chase scene between Shamshad (Rajkummar Rao) and Definite (Zeeshan) wasn't scripted originally. But Rajkummar and Zeeshan were so immersed in their character, that they started running when the scene was first shot. 

Seeing them at work, Anurag decided to incorporate the scene in the film. AD Shlok Sharma shot the scene by guiding the actors through walkie-talkies, shooting from rooftops, and forcing a traffic jam to take place, so as to add to the urgency of the scene. And Zeeshan even fell on the railway tracks when the final part of the chase scene was being shot. 

From the casting to the action scenes, everything about this film is a story in itself. Like the fact that Manoj Bajpayee was the one who recommended a lot of new actors to Anurag for the film, including Jaideep Ahlawat. Or that Vicky Kaushal worked as an AD on the film. 

3. When Aamir Khan, Sharman Joshi, and R. Madhavan actually got drunk on the sets of 3 Idiots, the shoot extended for so long, that the production crew ran out of film reel. 

Remember that epic scene where Rancho, Farhan, and Raju get drunk and get into a discussion of what really matters? Well, to get into the skin of the characters for the scene, the three actors actually got drunk. What followed was a shoot that extended for so long that all available film reel on the set was used, and director Rajkumar Hirani still wanted the shot to continue. 

Thus, late in the night, the ADs and production team scrambled to arrange additional reel at the last minute. Fortunately for them, a regional film was being shot nearby and there was additional reel available. 

4. The actor who plays the receptionist of Hotel Decent in Jab We Met is Teddy Maurya, the art director of the film.

The team tried to get an actor to come down to Manali, from Mumbai, for the scene. But since the final date for when this particular scene would be shot could not be finalized, no actor was available when required. Ultimately, Teddy Maurya, who actually designed the reception, ended up playing the receptionist. 

Hotel Deen scene in Jab We Met
Source: YouTube/Film Companion

5. Kajol saved Shah Rukh Khan's life when the two were shooting for Gerua for Dilwale.  

Kajol and Shah Rukh shot for Dilwale's Gerua (a cinematic and visual treat, if there ever was) in Iceland. For one of the scenes, the two were shooting behind a waterfall, and Shah Rukh Khan slipped on the rocks. He would have fallen had Kajol not instinctively grabbed on to him, literally, saving his life.   

Of course, considering the location of the shoot, the crew also faced other challenges and improvised on the sets. Like placing rocks on Kajol's dress, so the skirt does not fly off, and tying an iceberg so that is does not break during the shoot. 

6. The crew danced, like 'mental people', on Gallan Goodiyan in Dil Dhadakne Do.

After the shooting for Gallan Goodiyan ended--which, incidentally, had to be shot in a 45-minute window--Zoya played the whole song again for the entire cast and crew. And everyone got together and danced on the floor "like mental people" (as Shefali Shah put it).   

7. The most famous scene of Masaan, where Deepak (Vicky Kaushal) breaks down saying, Yeh Dukh Kaahe Khatam Nahi Hota, was originally written as a monologue. 

Varun Grover (screenwriter) had originally written the scene as a monologue and Vicky Kaushal was not supposed to cry in the end. However Vicky, who does not drink in general, actually consumed alcohol to help add to the intensity of the scene. 

In his own interpretation of the scene, he ended up crying and improvising, turning a three-minute-scene to an 8-minutes-long shoot, at the end of which, there was not a dry eye on the set. 

There was also a parallel storyline about Deepak's brother and his love interest in the film, that was completely cut out in the final edit. 

8. Kajol suffered an accident on the sets of Kuch Kuch Hota Hai and briefly lost her memory.   

While shooting for the song Yeh Ladka Hai Deewana, Kajol lost balance of the bicycle she was riding and injured herself. She was rushed to the hospital, where, after regaining consciousness, she had a brief memory loss and could not recognize anyone for some time. 

Incidentally, it was a phone call with Ajay Devgn that helped Kajol regain her memories. 

9. A young boy attacked Irrfan's car in Kashmir, where he was shooting for Haider. 

Vishal Bhardwaj wrote a short screenplay in memory of his friend, the late Irrfan Khan. In it, the director mentioned how, at the time of shooting for Haider, a young boy had flung a stone at Irrfan's car, shattering the screen. It was only because Irrfan stopped the security, that they did not fire at the boy. And Irrfan being Irrfan, actually compared the boy's shot to cricketer Jonty Rhodes.

Irrfan Khan
Source: Odishabytes

10. Anurag Kashyap held Manoj Bajpayee's legs when shooting for Satya's iconic scene because Bajpayee was scared of heights. So was Kashyap, for that matter. 

It's impossible to think of Satya and not remember Bhiku Mhatre (Manoj Bajpayee) shouting from the top of a cliff, "Mumbai ka king kaun?" 

However, in an Instagram post, director Anurag Kashyap, who co-wrote the script for Satya, shared that Manoj Bajpayee was actually scared of heights. And thus, Kashyap laid down and held his legs as the scene was being shot. 

Clearly, there's a lot that goes behind that perfect shot.