The anti-racism campaign that started in the US a few days ago has reached other parts of the world and people of all nationalities and backgrounds are raising their voices for justice. 

And while we are all acquainted with what's going on currently and how wrong it is, it never hurts to learn more. So here is a list of 10 movies that you can watch if you want to understand the topic of racism (especially in America), better.

1. Get Out (2017)

This is a story about an inter-racial couple that turns into a surreal, nightmarish tale of discrimination that you won't be able to forget for a long time. A movie that keeps you at the edge of your seat, Get Out gets more relevant with each watch.

You can watch it on Amazon Prime.

get out poster
Source: Mental Floss

2. Selma (2014)

Directed by Ava DuVernay, Selma is about the historic Selma to Montgomery voting rights marches led by Martin Luther King Jr. in 1965. It's a sneak peek into the history of the fight for equal voting rights, that didn't happen too long ago. In its review of the movie, Washington Post wrote: It was worth the wait.

You can watch it on Amazon Prime.

Selma the movie
Source: Independent.co.uk

3. Do the Right Thing (1989)

One of Spike Lee's best movies, Do the Right Thing is about police brutality in Brooklyn and in a lot of ways, predicted the events happening today. Crazy to think that this Academy Award nominated film released more than 3 decades ago. 

You can watch it on Amazon Prime.

Do the Right Thing
Source: Pitchfork

4. Moonlight (2016)

The winner of Academy Award for Best Picture, Moonlight tackled racism in the light of other issues like exploration of one's sexuality and place in the world. It's makes you wonder about the many struggles people of marginalised communities go through, in a profound manner. Don't miss this one.

You can watch it on Amazon Prime.

Moonlight
Source: Vox

5. 13th (2016)

This one is a documentary on the American prisons and how the number of African-Americans prisoners is a reflection of the country's systematic racism. It traces the flaws in the US judicial system and is a hard-hitting depiction of the reality. It got the Best Documentary nomination at the Oscars.

You can watch it on Netflix.

13th poster
Source: Vox

6. The Hate U Give (2018)

Based on Angie Thomas’ novel, The Hate U Give shows how racism isn't an 'adult issue' and affects children just as much. It's the story of a young girl who becomes an anti-racism activist after seeing her friend getting killed in front of her eyes. It's a good way to educate children as to what discrimination actually does.

You can watch it on Amazon Prime.

The Hate U Give
Source: The Guardian

7. I Am Not Your Negro (2017)

The movie has a heartbreaking story behind it. James Baldwin, an American novelist was writing a book named Remember This House. It was supposed to be about the lives of Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. However, he passed away before he could complete it. I Am Not Your Negro imagines how he would have completed the book. It also has letters from Baldwin.

You can watch it on Netflix.

I Am Not Your Negro
Source: The Humanities Institute - UC Santa Cruz

8. 12 Years a Slave (2013)

Directed by Steve McQueen, the movie is about slavery in America as the name suggests. It is based on the 1853 memoir of African-American Solomon Northup who was kidnapped in Washington. He remained in captivity for 12 years before release, hence the title.  

You can watch it on Netflix.

12 Years a Slave
Source: Amazon

9. Malcolm X (1992)

This movie is about one of the most popular civil rights activists in America, El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, AKA Malcolm X. He was a controversial figure and the movie gives an insight into his actions and thoughts. Denzel Washington, who played the lead role, got an Oscar nomination for the his breathtaking performance.

You can watch it on Amazon Prime.

Malcolm X
Source: Netflix

10. Whose Streets? (2017)

This is the movie on the killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown, who was shot dead by a police officer named Darren Wilson. This incident, among few others, laid the foundation of the #BlackLivesMatter movement and made it a global issue. Whose Streets? was co-directors Sabaah Folayan and Damon Davis' way of letting the world know what happened during the riots that followed Brown's murder in Ferguson.

You can watch it on Amazon Prime.

 Whose Streets
Source: NIOT

Watch. Learn. Introspect.