Game of Thrones is done and dusted. Despite receiving heavy criticism for shoddy writing this past season, it's still tough to say goodbye to something that's been with us for a decade. It's normal for a show to leave viewers hanging, but not getting closure after a series finale is a different kind of pain. 


Here are a few of the questions that haven't been answered post the Game of Thrones. 

Why is there still a Night's Watch? 

Considering the threat from the beyond the wall - the Night King and his army of the undead - got wiped out courtesy Arya Stark, we assumed there was not longer a need for the Night's Watch. Jon even questions Tyrion about it, to which he replies, "The world will always need a home for bastards and broken men." 

Source: Fanpop

Where did Drogon take Daenerys' body?

Considering he can flye, Drogon could literally be anywhere. Perhaps he went back to the place where he was born, in the wastelands beyond Lhazar. Sam later mentions that Drogon was spotted flying East. That could mean he's going towards Essos, the origins of the Targaryen line in Old Valyria, to lay her to rest among her ancestors.

Source: Youtube

How does Tyrion's 'honeycomb and jackass' joke end?

This incomplete quip has been a recurrent part of the series. He starts cracking it in season 1 while speaking to Lysa Arryn, and another time in season 6 while attempting to help Grey Worm and Missandei to understand humour. He gets cut off every time, so I guess we'll never know the ending.

Source: Vox

Did Bran know that Dany was going to burn the whole city down? And did he just not tell anyone?

We pretty much have to assume that Bran knew what was going to happen. He basically admitted it when he said he knew he would be chosen as king. If he knew so many innocents were going to die and yet did nothing to prevent it, is he honestly that fit to be a king? He might even be evil.

Source: Vox

How are there still so many Dothraki alive? What will they do now?

The Battle of Winterfell was a slaughter, and the first to go were the Dothraki. A small number of them managed to return back alive after fighting the undead. But when you see their numbers in the final episode, they seem to be back to their old strength. Also, considering their queen is dead, how exactly are they going to function in the new order?

Source: Express

What did Bran mean when he said he's going after the dragon?

When discussing the rogue dragon, Bran claims that maybe he can find him. It's unclear whether he's going to warg into Drogon himself, or use his general know-it-all powers to find him and capture/kill/completely ignore him.

Source: Express

 Is Jon Lord Commander or King Beyond The Wall?

Jon, Tormund and the Free Folk set out beyond the wall and into the real North. Maybe they're now the first line of defense against any new threat that might rear its head. But does this mean Jon is still in the Night's Watch, or has he left that and embraces being King Beyond The Wall?

Source: Vanityfair

What happened in Dorne, and where did the new prince come from?

There was obviously a whole bunch of things that went wrong in Dorne. The Sand sisters rebelled, only to consequently get captured and killed. In the great council however, we see a new Dornish prince. Who he is however, is never answered. 

Source: Vanityfair

What happened to Daario Naharis?

We last saw the loveable rogue in the season 6 finale, The Winds of Winter. Dany had asked him to remain in Meereen withe the Second Sons in order to keep the peace and not let society fall back into slavery. Presumably, that's where he still is. 

Source: Time

What happened to the Reeds? Wasn't Howland Reed the only one who knew who Jon was?

After helping Bran reach Winterfell Meera Reed returned to her home. Additionally, her father Howland Reed was the only person who knew Jon's true identity. Despite all of this, there's not a single mention of them in the final episode, even at the great council. Maybe they've renounced everything and are done with all the house bullshit.

Source: Gameofthrones

Why didn't Drogon kill Jon?

There are multiple theories behind this one. The most popular one is that Drogon realised it was ultimately the Iron Throne that caused his mother's death. It corrupted her soul and drove her to madness, and Jon was just doing the necessary.


It's also been posited that Drogon didn't kill him because he's a Targaryen, and they have a special bond.

Source: Youtube

Why did the North get to claim independence?

Everyone says 'Aye' to Bran the Broken, except Sansa. She claims that Winterfell was independent thousands of years ago, and it will be again, thus making her Queen in the North. If she can call for independence, why aren't the rest of the lords also asking for it? If it's that easy, wouldn't everyone be doing it?

Source: Popsugar

What was the point of the Azor Ahai prophecy?

Prophecies must be real in the GoT universe, otherwise Jon Snow couldn't have come back to life. Beric Dondarrion couldn't have been called back multiple times from death. To just skip the entire Azor Ahai prophecy feel like a bit of a cop-out.

Source: Hollywood reporter

Why does Bran need a Master of Whisperers if he knows everything already?

Varys was great and everything, but Bran is basically a super-being. He can see everything - the past, the future - he has no need for a Master of Whisperers.

Source: Tvline

Why did Brienne become Kingsguard for Bran instead of Queensguard for Sansa?

Considering she's closer to Sansa than Bran, it's strange that she chose to stay in King's Landing instead of by Sansa's side.

Source: Hotstar

What was the deal with the Children of the Forest?

The mysterious plant-like creatures who helped Bran and Meera escape were all but finished off by the undead. Considering their enigmatic history however, we didn't really get any closure about who they were. They appear to have created the White Walkers to defend themselves from men, but that plan went horribly wrong when the Night King decided they wanted to kill everybody.

Anyway, there's absolutely no clarity about them in the show.

Source: Wikia

What was the implication of the green plant they showed growing on the ground past the wall?

As Jon and the rest of the wildlings presumably venture beyond The Wall to live in the real north, we see a little plant sprouting from the snow. This could mean that the harsh conditions of that area might be slightly tempered now that the Night King is gone.

Source: Hotstar

A whole lot of questions, and very few answers. I guess we'll just have to wait till GRRM releases the next book to get a deeper insight into everything.