#MakingWhatBollywoodWouldnt. 

Actor Abhay Deol has been using this hashtag to explain the making of some of his movies, which have a cult status now.

As a part of this series, he discussed Manorama Six Feet Under a few days ago. 

And today, he elaborated on the process of making Dev D, which gave a modern twist to the old classic Devdas.

abhay deol in dev D
Source: Firstpost

It was Abhay, who came up with the concept, after he read the book and realised that the characters needed to be redefined. 

I could see that the character was a chauvinist, a misogynist, entitled, and arrogant. Yet he had been romanticized for decades! The women on the other hand were strong and had integrity, but there was still that expectation for them to love their man no matter what. I wanted to change that.
kalki in Dev D
Source: IMDb

Obviously, he faced a lot of challenges on the way as the makers felt it was 'too much of an art-film'.

However, he eventually got Anurag Kashyap on board.

Abhay's vision was to empower women in the story (Mahie Gill as Paro and Kalki Koechlin as Leni/Chanda), and not give Dev an unncessary redemptive arc.

I wanted to empower them, shed the image of the “good, devoted, woman”. It was time to make them independent, not defined by the man they love, or by men in general. 
Dev d mahie gill
Source: High On Flims

In fact, in his version, Dev died right outside Paro's house after being shot by the police. Anurag, though, thought it was too dark and said it would be better if Dev and Chanda get together. 

Anurag felt a happy ending would make the film more accepted by the audience, and his twist was to have Dev and Chanda fall in love. My vision was too dark! I went with the flow, and even brought my buddies Twilight Players to feature in it.

The rest, as Abhay says, is history. You can read the complete post here:

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“Dev.D” released in 2009. I spent a year narrating the idea to several people before I got Anurag on board to direct it. I remember people’s reaction upon hearing my narration, it was always, “it’s too much of an art-film”. Lucky for me Anurag got it. I had read the book and I could see that the character was a chauvinist, a misogynist, entitled, and arrogant. Yet he had been romanticized for decades! The women on the other hand were strong and had integrity, but there was still that expectation for them to love their man no matter what. I wanted to change that. I wanted to empower them, shed the image of the “good, devoted, woman”. It was time to make them independent, not defined by the man they love, or by men in general. Which is why Paro calls out Dev’s faults and puts him in his place. In my version Dev gets shot by the police (he becomes a drug dealer) outside Paro’s house and dies just like in the book. Chanda does not fall in love with him, and neither is she ashamed of being an East European high class escort (again, in my version 😊). She’s the strongest character of the 3, and isn’t afraid of being judged. She does empathize with Dev, seeing how broken he is, and I went with the “prostitute with the heart of gold” theme from the book. Anurag felt a happy ending would make the film more accepted by the audience, and his twist was to have Dev & Chanda fall in love. My vision was too dark! I went with the flow, and even brought my buddies @twilightplayers to feature in it. The rest is history. #makingwhatbollywouldnt #dev.d

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