What happens when creativity is tied to a fierce competition of trade? A mad race begins.

While the world's hunger for innovative ideas expands exponentially, nobody really thinks about the transformation of the creative industry. From a platform letting imaginative minds express uninhibitedly and organically, to the one that has fettered them with time and money, the industry has changed manifold.

Linds Redding, a 52-year-old art director from New Zealand who died of esophageal cancer, expressed on his blog how mechanisation of the creative industry has reduced it into a farce before he died of cancer. Here are some excerpts from his blog that rightly hit the nerves.

The trick to being truly creative, I’ve always maintained, is to be completely unselfconscious. To resist the urge to self-censor. To not-give-a-shit what anybody thinks. That’s why children are so good at it.

The compulsion to create is unstoppable. It’s a need that has to be filled. I’ve barely ‘worked’ in any meaningful way for half a year, but every day I find myself driven to ‘make’ something. Take photographs. Draw. Write. Make bad music. What I have witnessed happening in the last twenty years is the aesthetic equivalent of the Industrial Revolution in the 19th century. The wholesale industrialization and mechanistation of the creative process. Ideas themselves have become just another disposable commodity to be supplied to order by the lowest bidder. As soon as they figure out a way of outsourcing thinking to China they won’t think twice. Believe me. Have you ever tried to have an idea. Any idea at all, with a gun to your head?

Images from lindsredding.com

It turns out I didn't actually like my old life nearly as much as I thought I did. I know this now because I occasionally catch up with my old colleagues and work-mates. They fall over each other to enthusiastically show me the latest project they're working on. Ask my opinion. Proudly show off their technical prowess (which is not inconsiderable.) I find myself glazing over but politely listen as they brag about who's had the least sleep and the most takeaway food. "I haven’t seen my wife since January, I can't feel my legs any more and I think I have scurvy but another three weeks and we'll be done. It's got to be done by then The client’s going on holiday. What do I think?" What do I think? I think you're all fucking mad. Deranged. So disengaged from reality it's not even funny. It's a fucking TV commercial. Nobody gives a shit. This has come as quite a shock I can tell you. I think, I've come to the conclusion that the whole thing was a bit of a con. A scam. An elaborate hoax. Countless late nights and weekends, holidays, birthdays, school recitals and anniversary dinners were willingly sacrificed at the altar of some intangible but infinitely worthy higher cause. It would all be worth it in the long run… This was the con. Convincing myself that there was nowhere I’d rather be was just a coping mechanism. I can see that now. It wasn't really important. Or of any consequence at all really. How could it be. We were just shifting product. Our product, and the clients. Just meeting the quota. Feeding the beast as I called it on my more cynical days. So was it worth it? Well of course not. It turns out it was just advertising. There was no higher calling. Oh. And if your reading this while sitting in some darkened studio or edit suite agonizing over whether housewife A should pick up the soap powder with her left hand or her right, do yourself a favour. Power down. Lock up and go home and kiss your wife and kids.

His full blog can be read here .