Mumbai Pride Parade, 2020, was as much about celebrating people from LGBTQAI+ community - as it was about the fighting against the draconian laws in the process of being launched by the government.

The creatives side of people was at best display, as they combined the two causes, and created posters that are were very clear in the statement they were making.

There were reports of the police denying permission for the parade, fearing that people will raise their voice against CAA and NRC. However, people still turned up and held the parade, giving out a strong statement that they are not to be intimidated.

Source: Firstpost
Source: Firstpost
Source: Aditi Suryavanshi/The Quint
Source: Aditi Suryavanshi/The Quint
Source: The Print
Source: The Indian Express
Source: The Indian Express
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It is such an enormous feeling, of privilege, of liberation, of inner alignment, to stand tall in your authenticity, to belong to a movement and community that celebrates love without biases, that fights for a world where love wins. Mumbai pride wasn't a celebratory march this time, but we came together and shared the love nonetheless. This feeling of relatability, of belonging, of connectedness to each others stories is the thing that will get us through in trying times. There is great comfort and strength in knowing this resilience, this bravery, this pride that connects us all. This is #lgbtq India shining. More pics soon. Stay tuned. #mumbaipride #mumbaipride2020 #pride #pridemonth #solidarity #gayindia #gayindian #outandproud #blessed #queerlife #lgbtindia #lgbtrights #lgbtequality #lgbtactivism #loveislove #lovewins #rainbowwins #prideflag #gayboy #instagay

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Scenes from Mumbai Pride, 2020—the pride that almost wasn’t after the original venue fell through two days prior. . The event—held in Azad Maidan this year—was ridiculously well organised considering the numerous hoops organisers had to jump through. But I caught off guard with a lot of conversations saying there was “no need” for pride to be “so political.” I don’t understand this thinking (I’m trying)—surely everything is political, especially in the India we currently live in. But beyond that, pride *has* to be political. It’s naive to think otherwise, and it comes from a place of privilege to do so, too. . This is still a country where two people of the same sex can’t marry. Heck—two years ago, colonial-era sodomy laws were a thing. And where LGBT persons can’t serve (openly) in the military. This is a country where trans rights are being quashed by a “protection” bill. Where same-sex couples can’t adopt a child. . It. Is. All. Political. . . . . . . . . . #mumbaipride #lgbtqia #lgbtrights #mumbaipride2020 #🏳️‍🌈 #lgbtcommunity #india #mumbai #allyandproud #ally #azadmaidan #lgbt #lgbtq🌈 #lgbtindia #lgbtsupporter #nohatejustlove

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In a country that is just beginning to recognise the rights of the people belonging to the LGBTQAI+ community, laws like CAA and NRC are just going to make things worse for them. More power to every one fighting for their rights.