At long last, Facebook users will finally be able to do more than just like posts on their favourite social. It may end the moral quandary that many users faced when they 'liked' something that was terrible or incredibly sad. Facebook has announced that users will be able to love posts and express sympathy, anger or sadness with animated emoticons.

"Dislike," as Mark Zuckerberg had recently indicated, is not one of the options.

Today we’re launching a pilot test of Reactions — a more expressive Like button. As you can see, it’s not a “dislike” button, though we hope it addresses the spirit of this request more broadly. We studied which comments and reactions are most commonly and universally expressed across Facebook, then worked to design an experience around them that was elegant and fun. Starting today Ireland and Spain can start loving, wow-ing, or expressing sympathy to posts on Facebook by hovering or long-pressing the Like button wherever they see it. We’ll use the feedback from this to improve the feature and hope to roll it out to everyone soon.

Posted by Chris Cox on Thursday, 8 October 2015

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said in a Facebook post Thursday that users have been requesting ways other than like to respond to posts, such as when someone posts about the death of a loved one or a tragic news story.

"Not every moment is a good moment, and sometimes you just want a way to express empathy," wrote Zuckerberg, who said last month the company was working on expanding the like button.

"A like might not be the best way to express yourself." In a video accompanying a Facebook post by Chief Product Officer Chris Cox, the six new buttons appear as animated emoticons and pop up when the "like" button is long-pressed.

The company said it would pilot the new features in Ireland and Spain on iOS, Android and desktops. The feedback from the pilot test will be used to improve the feature. The company hopes "to roll it out to everyone soon," Cox wrote in the post, which was "liked" by more than 7,500 people within two hours.

Source: Facebook

"As you can see, it's not a 'dislike' button, though we hope it addresses the spirit of this request more broadly," Cox wrote in his post. Zuckerberg's comments last month, which many users took to mean the social network was working on a "dislike" button, spearheaded a debate over whether it would cause cyberbullying and negativity on the site. But users mostly welcomed Cox's announcement, saying on social media it was a smart idea.

With inputs from Reuters