For the purpose of this article, I am going to assume that everyone here is at least in their 20s had their board exams a while ago. 

Source: Gfycat

Now, when we were growing up, did any of you ever imagine scoring 100/100 in English or any literature subject for that matter? 

Source: Tenor

Cos kids these days are getting full marks there and I've no idea how. What has changed in the last 10 years of the 4000-5000-year-old history of language that kids are acing those exams? 

And no, I am not going to sit here and blame the kids. I blame the CBSE. Yo, WTF? What are your parameters for checking and how are you grading 'perfect essays'. I am assuming kids still have to write those in their boards. 

Source: Indian Expres

How are you giving 10 out of 10 on essays, the interpretation of which are entirely subjective? 

I hope CBSE teachers realise that there are other boards in the country. And eve CBSE kids will have to go to college someday. That 100/100 won't fly very well down there. 

Even the CBSE class 12th topper thinks so. 

Source: Jagran
I don’t think one should get full marks in English because no letter or essay can be perfect. 

                    - Tushar Singh

I don't know about people from Delhi but back home, in small towns, everyone would tell us if you got 80+ marks in English, you would get ahead in life. No matter, how good you were. Even if you were quoting Shakespeare from memory (yeah, Shakespeare was the peak of intellect for CBSE students), you would still be lucky to score 90. 

Source: Memebase

There aren't a lot of other arguments here. There's no perfect way to write literature. Hence, you can't have a perfect score. It ain't maths!

Source: Giphy

And I am not the only one who thinks this way. 

I mean, we are proud of kids scoring this well in all their papers. It's great for them. But nobody, and I repeat, nobody should ever get full marks in English. You can't.