Sundar, susheel, aagyakaari. 

Beautiful, sincere, obedient.

It's 2020 but you will still find a number of people looking for these qualities in their future wife/daughter-in-law. 

The proof of the same can be found in numerous matrimonial ads. 

Which brings us to a post on Instagram page Zikr-e-Dilli, which discusses in detail, how matrimonial ads in the late 90s used to specifically mention: 'Girls from JNU, LSR or Miranda House need not apply'.

women of lsr, miranda
Source: Instagram/Zikr-e-Dilli

The reason? Presumably, that if they are educated from these prestigious women colleges, they'll ask questions, rebel against injustice, question the deep-rooted patriarchy.

Majority of families did not even want to consider the possibility of these things happening.

women of lsr, miranda
Source: Instagram/Zikr-e-Dilli

The post further mentions, how the grooms' families would go as far as mentioning the level of education and course of the women 'applicants':

The ads described the level of education that prospective brides ought to have; subject and college choices of the prospective brides were also emphasised by the groom's families. Most of these ads demanded women with university education but with strict terms and conditions.
students of women colleges in DU
Source: Instagram/Zikr-e-Dilli

Basically, the idea was to have a well-educated wife from a good college, who forgets everything she has learnt as soon as she gets married. 

The history of these colleges, and their role in women's movement may have been the reason behind that.

student studying in women colleges of DU
Source: Instagram/Zikr-e-Dilli

Diving into history, the post mentions that the first women's college in Delhi, Indraprastha College for Women (IPCW), was started on request of Annie Besant, who stressed that it was important that women got good education and expanded their horizons.

In May, 1904, Annie Besant, president of the Theosophical Society wrote a letter emphasising the importance of women's education to the secretary of the local branch of the society, Lala Balkishan Dass. 
women in DU colleges
Source: Instagram/Zikr-e-Dilli

Her request was accepted and soon, Indraprastha Putri Pathshala, was opened on May 20, 1904. 

Indraprastha Putri Pathshala, an all-girls school, was opened on May 20, 1904, in two rooms of a haveli of Chippiwara near Jama Masjid. By 1924, it developed into the first women’s college of the city, Indraprastha College for Women.
Indraprastha college for women
Source: Instagram/Zikr-e-Dilli

That was just the start as many women's colleges were built in years to come. These included: Miranda House in 1948, Lady Shri Ram College (LSR) in 1956, followed by Kamala Nehru College, Gargi College, Maitreyi College, etc.

As an alumna of one of these institutions (Indraprastha College for Women), I know very well how exactly the reservations against women from these colleges manifest themselves.

DU Girls
Source: Miranda House

Ye toh dharne pe baith jaayegi (she will sit on a strike).

This line is thrown at you as if sitting on a strike is wrong and fighting for your rights, being unreasonable.

And if you come from some other city, there are taunts you constantly have to hear. Such as: 'Un ladkiyon ki tarah matt ban jaana' (don't become like 'those girls').

Well, I looked up to a lot of those girls and always will.

DU colleges
Source: The Hindu

And as far as the demand 'please don't apply if you're from JNU, LSR or Miranda House' in matrimonial sites is concerned, I don't think the women ever needed to do it.

We deserve better, always did.  

You can read the complete post, here:

View this post on Instagram

"जे.एन.यू , एल.एस.आर, मिरांडा हाउस की लड़कियां आवेदन ना करें।" “Girls from JNU, LSR or Miranda House need not apply.” This notoriously popular phrase emerged from some of the matrimonial ads published in late 90s in Delhi. These classifieds categorically stated that “girls from JNU, LSR or Miranda House need not apply.” The ads described the level of education that prospective brides ought to have; subject and college choices of the prospective brides were also emphasised by the groom's families. Most of these ads demanded women with university education but with strict terms and conditions. However, behind this popular phrase, there's a long and dynamic history of women's colleges in Delhi. From expanding the scope of academic learning to participating in women's movements, the women’s colleges of DU have played an important role in shaping education for women through the 20th century. In the early 20th century, the options for women's university education were fairly limited in the city. In May, 1904, Annie Besant, president of the Theosophical Society wrote a letter emphasising the importance of women's education to the secretary of the local branch of the society, Lala Balkishan Dass. It was in response to this letter that the Indraprastha Putri Pathshala , an all-girls school, was opened on May 20, 1904, in two rooms of a haveli of Chippiwara near Jama Masjid. By 1924, it developed into the first women’s college of the city, Indraprastha College for Women. Further, Miranda House, was established in 1948 by the then VC of DU, Maurice Gwyer. The massive influx of refugees after Partition led to an increasing demand for colleges serving the educational needs of women. From the mid-1950s, some philanthropic entrepreneurs opened colleges across the city. Lady Shri Ram College (LSR) was established by Lala Shri Ram, in 1956 in honour of his wife Phoolan Devi. From its humble origins in a school building at Daryaganj, the college moved to Lajpat Nagar in 1958. In the 1960s, the Delhi government built several colleges for women, such as Kamala Nehru, Gargi, Maitreyi, Shyama Prasad Mukherji and Bharati. Today, DU has 22 women's colleges. (Continued in comments)

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