Be it India’s IT hub, Bengaluru, or the country’s capital, Delhi, the havoc caused by rain in both cities is equally bad. Thanks to climate change and people’s ignorance towards it, the situation only gets worse every year.

1. Waterlogging

The poor drainage system in both the cities mixed with the heavy rainfall in the monsoon season turns almost every road waterlogged. The flooded roads caused traffic congestion, bringing everyday life to a halt. While Bengaluru saw employees reaching offices in tractors, an advisory for work-from-home was launched for employees in NCR.

2. Potholes

Be it Bengaluru or Delhi, or any part of the country for that matter, most of the roads in the country are filled with potholes. And as soon as the rain hits, the sight of men dying by falling from their vehicles due to these unseen potholes and then getting crushed by some heavier vehicle coming from behind becomes common.

potholes monsoon
Source: The Hans India

The sad news is that these deaths caused due to government negligence don’t even get mentioned in the news. According to reports, between 2013 and 2017, 14,926 people died due to potholes on the roads in our country – a loss which could have been avoided rather easily. Although the years have changed, the pothole problems are as bad today as they were before.

3. Traffic Jams

The incessant rainfall leads to waterlogging, and combined with potholes, traffic jams become unavoidable. While Bengaluru saw a 2km long traffic jam in several areas, the situation was not much different in the national capital either.

monsoon
Source: All That Trending

4. Deaths

A 23-year-old woman died due to electrocution after slipping on a flooded road in Bengaluru. While a man died of the same reason in Gurgaon. According to reports, 2000 people have been killed every year since 2016 due to monsoon-related calamities in India.

monsoon
Source: News18

Global warming, government negligence, poor drainage system, poor waste management system, and the problems that come with that, are not constrained to some city borders anymore and are becoming a nationwide phenomenon.

The sad part is that the people getting most affected by this don’t even have the means to change their situation. The story is the same everywhere, the poor people are forced to stay in slums due to their financial conditions or social status and don’t have the luxury to change either. And we don’t even know when the situation will change anywhere.

And these are just the incidents that make the news. This is all without talking about the situation in the hills when it rains or the flooding in the Northeast, both of which happen every year, neither of which gets much of a slot in the prime-time news.